Chemists Without Borders

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Friday, October 27, 2006

58 Open Access Chemistry Journals

As of today, the Directory of Open Access Journals lists 58 titles under Chemistry.

The list of titles might be of interest to Chemists Without Borders members, as the journals are published in many countries - including Japan, China, Korea, Slovenia, Croatia, Thailand, Turkey, India, the USA, to name a few.

One way any Chemist can easily advance the cause of Chemists Without Borders is to make a point of reading or browsing through journals from developing countries. Cite a fellow researcher in a developing country - or invite them to participate in a research project.

To advance the cause of Chemists Without Borders' Chemistry Education, have students do at least one assignment using a resource such as the DOAJ list, and specify that students include the works of authors from developing countries.

3 comments:

  1. More importantly for authors, 11 of those have no publication fees either, which you can get by clicking on the for authors on the bottom left. I would encourage students to focus on these to encourage truly open science to develop.

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  2. Very good point, Jean-Claude!

    Another thought - it seems I overlooked the obvious: chemists, please consider publishing in these open access journals, so that your work is readily available to everyone in the world. As Jean-Claude points out, there are different business models. It is a good idea to support the journals that do not need to charge processing fees, as these journals are more easily accessible for publishing purposes for our colleagues around the globe.

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  3. "To advance the cause of Chemists Without Borders' Chemistry Education, have students do at least one assignment using a resource such as the DOAJ list, and specify that students include the works of authors from developing countries."

    The above comments are apparently, well-intentioned, however, my worry is the fact that works by authors from so-called "developing" countries are not regarded as being qualitative enough for use by so-called "westerners", be they students or otherwise.

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